About

Therese Borchard is the Founder of Project Hope & Beyond, an online community for persons with treatment-resistant depression and other chronic mood disorders, as well as their families and friends who want to better understand them. Recently she was the Emotional Health Columnist for EverydayHealth.com, where she wrote the popular blog “Sanity Break,” Associate Editor at PsychCentral.com, and a contributor to YahooCNN.com, The Huffington Post, PBS.org, and other media outlets. She currently maintains her own blog here on ThereseBorchard.com and holds a day job as senior writer at Crosby Marketing Communications in Annapolis, Maryland.

For seven years, Therese penned the hit blog, “Beyond Blue,” on Beliefnet.com, which was named a Top 10 Depression blog by Health.com and Healthline.com. Her work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, USA Today, Guideposts, O magazine, Psychology Today, Parenting, and the Washington Post, as well as on Time.com, AOL.com, Fox-News.com, and Yahoo! She has been named a Top 10 Influencer in the Online Depression Community by Sharecare.com, the health platform created by Dr. Mehmet Oz and Jeff Arnold, with founding partners Oprah Winfrey, Sony Pictures, and Discovery Communications. An advocate for mental health awareness, Therese is a regular guest on radio programs throughout the country, and has appeared on national television shows such as “Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher,” “Fox & Friends,” and “ABC News Now.”

Therese is the author of “Beyond Blue: Surviving Depression & Anxiety and Making the Most of Bad Genes,” “The Pocket Therapist: An Emotional Survival Guide,” and “What Does Depressed Mean? A Guidebook for Children with a Depressed Loved One,” among other titles. She holds a Master of Arts Degree in Theological Studies from the University of Notre Dame and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humanities Degree in 2011 by her alma mater, Saint Mary’s College, for her outstanding contributions to the field of mental health. She is the recipient of the 2014 Ray of Light Award by the Dave Nee Foundation and is a Special Advisor to the Johns Hopkins Mood Disorders Center.

Therese lives with her husband, Eric, and their two children, David and Katherine.

Click HERE for her personal story.

 

 

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99 thoughts on “About

  1. Your words to Mother Teresa are priceless! Sounds like something I would say in the presence of greatness. I stumbled upon your blog last night and couldn’t stop reading. You’re a very gifted and highly entertaining writer.

    1. Struggling with severe depression I searched the internet last night for ideas on how to simply get out of bed and came upon your site. After watching several videos I decided to join. I managed to get out of bed today and am grateful for you sharing your struggles in hopes of helping so many that suffer. I read some articles from the different forums this morning for more inspiration to help me out of this overwhelming sadness and anxiety. I look forward to learning from your experiences and others and as a believer in faith can’t help but feel I was directed to your site for a reason through the hands of God as I know he knows and feels my pain. I’m not familiar with the site enough to navigate to send a note to you so I just responded to this article. If there’s a more direct way to ask you a question or anyone please let me know otherwise I’ll hope this gets to u so you know how grateful I am for your site and time you take helping others. Thank you and am so glad I found this site. God bless you

      1. I found this site only because of a long research on welcoming death… I felt for almost the very 1st time someone got it… My friend is fighting cancer she wants life, I have cried because I wish I was the one that had it! I wouldn’t get treatment, I would welcome death with open arms.

      1. I ran onto one of your articles about the effects of chlorine, candida, etc etc… and, I wanted to suggest to you that if you have any stomach problems, try CULEN; It’s an herb and you can drink it as tea. I learnt about it in one of my hiking trips along the Peruvian Andes. Believe me, it works like a miracle and you will never again need to take Pepto Bismol, Magnesium milk, antiacids, yogurts or especial agents to improve your stomach flora.

      2. Dear Therese,
        I admire you greatly for what you do, your faith and your courage.
        I have a favorite sister, her husband killed himself 4 years ago due to bi-polar.
        I just want to tell you that I just watch an incredible NOVA program called “Ride the Tiger.”
        It talks about bipolar. Please watch.
        Please know that you are in my prayer.
        Dat

        1. Hi thorese!! I haven’t received your answer on email yet!! About, I’d like to read “8 things you need to know when you’re not getting well” I’m sooooo desperate!!!! Thx, Debbie

      3. Thank you, Therese! You are doing important work. Tonight, I found your article, “5 Things to Do When You Feel Insecure” and it was very helpful (far more so than the “10 Things” article I found by a Ph.D. in Psychology Today). After reading that article, I saw your book and blog. I bought your book and joined your online community. Thanks for being a lamp unto my feet.

      4. Did anyone hear the talk show on a main broadcast station from Phillidelphia, where they were talking about Depression, alternative trials and testing that is taking place NOW at PENN STATE University. They actually said on the show that 50% of those with depression do not respond to these highly toxic medications. If anyone can shed some light on this for me it would be so greatly appreciated.

  2. Well guess what? My name is Theresa too! (smile) I’ve suffered and still are suffering from depression/anxiety my whole life actually. I stumbled across this blog and thought “this was meant to be” I plan on ordering several of your books to take on vacation with me to read. Thank You!!!!!!!!!!!

  3. Thank you for your book, Beyond Blue. It made me laugh, but so many comments and descriptions rang true for me. I especially related to the fact that you spend most of your energy every single day maintaining your mental health. It just never occurred to me that there may be many people like me doing that! Depression and anxiety are inexplicable to those who don’t struggle with them day to day. I put myself down a lot for not being super woman, but I would rather be even keel than go back to the abyss. I’m also guilt ridden and a highly sensitive person (how those chapters made me laugh aloud!); I am eager to read some of your recommended books. Again, what made me think I was the only one with freakishly low tolerance for commotion and the often unfortunate tendency to absorb the emotions of everyone around me? I could go on and on. Sorry! Thanks again for baring your soul, for reaching out and connecting. Let me leave you with a story from the other night: my cat brought a baby field mouse up from the basement. The poor thing was gasping for breath. I gingerly picked it up with a papertowel and took it outside. I then proceeded to “sit” with it for 30 minutes so that it wouldn’t die alone! And I still feel guilty for what my cat did and for that little mouse that never got to live a full life. I remind myself every time, that God cares for every creature and thank him for this. Ai caramba!

    1. Therese, Both of your books have helped me so much. I appreciate your taking the time over a year ago to respond to me personally when I was in a severe depression. Thanks to a new psychiatrist and my psychologist, I feel better. I am still struggling with perfectionism and symmetry in OCD, but am getting better at recognizing and accepting life the way it is. Everything does not have to be perfect and/or symmetrical. I wish you the very best. You have helped so many of us.
      Ted

    2. You are absolutely adorable! (And I don’t mean that in a condescending ‘Bless Your Heart’ way lol. I mean it in a I’ve pretty much been there, done that, and feel exactly how you are feeling sort of way, and YOU of all people would appreciate how I find it so just perfectly adorable, sweet, precious and somehow can find no words for infinitely beautiful and touching a soul like yours is, and identify with all of your qualities, actions and feelings but AM COMPLETELY incapable of finding anything but loathing for the EXACT same qualities in myself! You HAVE to laugh!!! At least I can find the whole irony really funny! Lots of Love and Respect to You!!!)

    3. Natasha, I found out about Therese from a coworker just last week and decided to check her out today. I have suffered from anxiety and depression my entire life. I have been medicated for about 13 years but struggle daily. I too am guilt ridden and a highly sensitive person and when I read your post I could so relate. I have a hard time finding people who understand me and what I am going through. It is such a blessing to read posts like yours and know that I am not alone. Thank you.

  4. I think you are having a major bout of depression . I went through that in my early 20’s. I cried and just did not know what was wrong with me. I felt so horrible and my mom just did not know what to do. I went and saw a psychiatrist and I was scared and embarrassed. (this was in the early 80’s) She put me on an antidepressant and a mild nerve med and I never knew how helpful medication for depression really was. Please go see your physician, a family doctor to start with. They can evaluate you and see if your depression is bad enough to warrant hospitalization. There are also crisis help lines you can call. Do it now honey. you don’t have to live in darkness like that. Or if you feel like you can’t hold on anymore go to the nearest emergency room. Your loved ones simply do not understand what you are going through and this is very normal. It doesn’t mean they do not love you, they are scared.

    1. Hello,

      Just off Effexor 150 mg since early April. Tapered off as per my Dr’s instruction. Decided not to be on this drug, and go for walks and enjoy nature. Have been on Paxil 20-40 mg off and on the last 20 years and felt that a new drug in my system might be the answer to feeling less depressed/anxious. Ha, no wonder drug there. Did the best on Paxil. Still feeling the post after effects of Effexor. I am more irritable, impatient, and crying every day the last week.
      Going through empty nest syndrome, sort of with my only son. It was only he and I against the world, or so it seemed, as a single parent. He’s 23 now and I feel like “what now”. What do I do with myself now at 63. Had him at 40! I think we overly sensitive, compassionate people are more prone to absorbing sadness in life, unfairness in some outcomes, such as a cancer at the onset of retirement, or a tragedy of some sort.
      I just hang in there, pray to God and hope for clarity. All of your notes are inspiring and I wish you lighter footsteps in the days ahead. RD

  5. I just read 10 things to say to someone who is depressed… your advise was wonderful and was not at all expecting the humor that came along with it… Sorry to say I was not familiar with you… But I soon will be.. I am studying and researching depression and will be reading your work.. Thanks for the laughs, I needed them

  6. Hello Therese!
    Just got the ‘The Pocket Therapist’! I love that book! Thank you for that emotional survival kit! :)
    Greetings from Austria!
    Anita C.
    Vielen Dank, für dieses tolle Buch!

  7. Here are my comments on your recent posts on Sanity Break:

    From: “April is the Cruelest Month:”

    This [The Waste Land] is one of my favorite poems and in fact, I wrote a blog post last week (or was it the week before) using this poem and talking about my annual spring melancholy :-) Oh and Therese, for me, my spring melancholy is about change and pressure. Oh and of course bad allergies. I adore fall and winter and the change is hard. I love long dark cozy winter nights so the change to more lights is hard. Also the pressure. There is always so much activity and energy around me in spring and it makes me feel pressure to be “out there” which is very hard for me to do which is probably why I love winter so much– it’s an excuse to hibernate :-)

    From: “I Can’t Believe He Hasn’t Left You:”

    This post is so poignant.

    I am not married but my Mom is my best friend and she worries about me and it’s really hard for me to balance that space as you said between being honest or becoming strangers. That goes for anxiety and an autoimmune condition that I battle. Sometimes I’ll say I’m fine or I slept well when she asks but she always knows and she claims she wants to know the truth so I give it to her but only on my worst days to I really and truly give her lots of details about my struggles.

    Bless your heart. I’m so sorry you’re having such a bad time.

    I pray that if and when I get married that I will have a husband like your husband who is steadfast, loyal and true.

    From: “The Awkward Place of Healing Between Conventional and Alternative Medicine:”

    This is a really interesting post and I respect you so much. I am glad you are sharing more about your struggles and what you are doing to try to get well. I agree with you that there just has to be mixing of the two types of medicine.

    There is such a stigma around anything mental health but somehow I find that if family or friends ask about how I cope with anxiety, I feel much more comfortable telling them that sometimes I just take a long bath and listen to Enya rather than something like… “well, when I can’t catch a breath from anxiety and panic, I try deep breathing but it doesn’t work unless I pop a Xanax to make it work.” I do both things but as I said I’m more comfortable discussing a hot bath and Enya music :-)

    P.S. I hope the Psych Central comments show up over there and if they do, I’ll place them on this page but if not, I’ll come back and retype them here :-)

  8. Here are my comments from your recent Psych Central Posts:

    From: “Dancing in the Rain:”

    This is one of my favorite of your recent posts. I am the same as you were when you said:

    “Like most people with compromised health, I have concentrated my energy for the last 40 years on how to get rid of the pain, how to get to a better spot where I will be able to live more freely and won’t have to spend so many hours with my nose to a self-help book or scribbling symptoms in my mood journal, recording the day’s number, between a serene 0 and a suicidal 5.”

    And Therese, thank you for saying this which was a new concept to my brain:

    “One of the lessons taught in the mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program, which I am participating in, is to approach pain in a new way: as a friend from whom we can learn a thing or two and as something we can work with, rather than an enemy from whom we have to run.”

    I want to run from pain. I always feel like I need to get to the place where I am pain free (physical, mental and emotional) but when I read this post, I realized I do have those days every now and again but they are few and far between. The general rule is I’m dealing with severe anxiety, OCD, an autoimmune condition that wears me out, allergies, sinus and working full time and trying to be productive at work even though much of the time I’m experiencing at least a few symptoms of my illnesses and many days,

    I spend a lot of time working on keeping myself … how shall I put this…. in a functional place? I guess that’s the best way I can describe it. I mean these last 3 months have been so bad with a painful and exhausting autoimmune condition and I’m finally (through therapy) learning to “give myself a break” and not be so mad at myself or blame myself for causing my health problems which creates more problems. And I’m learning to be okay with the fact that I don’t have the stamina I usually do. SIgh. I’m sure you know how it is.

    You are so right that I need to learn to dance in the rain and not have this out of reach goal for myself of getting rid of all the pain and bad stuff. The goal is to live as I am and feel more content and less frustrated. Thank you so so so much for this post! You say so beautifully what my therapist has been trying to tell me but it just didn’t really sink in until I read your post.

    From: “An Interview with Gayathri Ramprasad:”

    I read this post a few weeks ago and found it really interesting and I want to read her book. My father is from India and he has mental illness though he’d never admit it, let alone seek treatment. I think for him, it really is a cultural stigma.

  9. Hi, Therese –

    I recently began reading your posts on everydayhealth.com. I have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Raynaud’s, and a few other flurries of biological self-attack, plus anxiety swings.

    I just wanted to say THANK YOU for your candor. Your blogs are very illuminating to me, comforting and informative. I appreciate your approach and your honesty about these things many of us struggle so fiercely with.

    Thank you very much!
    Be well :)!
    Heather

  10. Dear Therese,
    I have just finished reading “Beyond Blue…” the book. Thank you for writing it. My son suffered from depression and alcoholism and he took his own life two years ago on July 10th. I have struggled to understand why and your book has given me insight into his pain and suffering. His depression was untreated because that was his choice. I think because he was scared of the demons, of medications, the shame and a myriad of other reasons. He had a previous attempt and was hospitalized across the country from me. Because of HIPPA regulations I was unable to talk with anyone about it. I tried to emphasize with the hospital the seriousness of his mental state. He apparently agreed to hospitalization of “treatment” of what I don’t know. There was no bed available in the hospital where he was, so he was given his papers and told to go the hospital across town. He walked out the door and left. He eventually came to my home and I tried my hardest to get him help, but, with his resistance and no job or insurance I could not. He hung himself in my bathroom when I was away visiting his brother. This story is no different from so many others. As a society we must do better for those who suffer a mental illness. Your efforts, insights and work are appreciated. Again, thank you.

    1. Annette,
      My heart aches for you. I am so sorry for your tragedy and for your pain. I will keep you in my prayers. Thank you for your generous feedback and for trusting me with your story. Wishing you much peace and joy, Therese

      1. Thank you, Therese. I have found a wonderful Suicide Survivors Support Group in Rapid City and attend regularly. Out of that group there are several of us who have become good friends. All of us lost our sons and depression and alcoholism were involved. It is important to me to read and understand the pain our loved ones were living. I was fortunate in that my pastor is a loving priest and our Deacon is a close friend of over 45 years. I have and had a great deal of support at the time of Jimmy’s death. I only hope to pass it on. There is hope and healing for those of us left grieving.

  11. Therese,

    Thank you for writing your book, Beyond Blue, I read it all in one sitting today and it gave me a lot of hope when I couldn’t get out of bed today. I am in love with this blog site, thank you so much. I’ve been suicidally depressed for about two years now, and everyone says it will get better, but as the days go on, my confidence and hope crumbles just a little bit more. I hate myself so much for my disease that I’ve convinced myself that taking my own life might relieve others of my burden, and so making it to midnight without acting on my urges is the best I can do most days. I don’t have a family, I’m young, and could potentially have a bright future if not for this disease. I feel like a freak, watching other young women my age go about their business, function in the world, and achieve things, when my biggest achievement each day is getting out of bed (which only happens some days). Please keep writing, and I’ll keep reading. Would also appreciate any feedback or support.

    Thanks.
    Lindsay L.

  12. Therese,
    My name’s Ashlyn, and I’m 16. My freshman year of high school (I am currently a junior) led me to believe that I was a bad seed. If there was a choice of a good and bad road to turn down, I always seemed to pick the bad one. I hurt nearly everyone important to me, and I don’t even know if I cared. Last December, though, something hit me and I went through this ordeal that I, and everyone else in my life, likes to call ‘The Big Turn Around’. I picked myself up off of that battle ground, and crawled my way to safety. Then began the building up of what I had once ruined, which was beyond difficult. I did it though. I reshaped myself into the person I always wanted to be. Although in May, I discovered, after a mishap at school, which led me to a cardiologist, which, in tern, led me to a answer: I have severe anxiety.
    3 weeks later, I picked your book (The Pocket Therapist) off of a book shelf in the condo I was staying in. I thought, laughing at the idea of it, “this should be a riot!” Then, once I started the first page, I knew that it was something more than just a self-help book. I got up every morning for a week and read your book in a chair in the sun by the pool during my quiet time. And I finished it. Yet even now, every morning, during my quiet time, I open the book to a random spot, and start my day out with one of your tips. Some days are good, some days are bad, as all are, but receiving some of your wisdom is like having stepping stones to and from through a river of hot coals, a big help. Your book has pushed me to dig deeper within myself so I can attempt to figure out who I am and what I’m doing here.
    I just wanted to thank you for putting your words, your thoughts, hell, basically your diary out there for others to do what they please with it, because it’s helped me indefinitely. You should be very proud of what you’ve done and what you’re doing in your life. You’ve worked so hard, and though sometimes you take a wrong turn (as we all do), you seem to have a good understanding of what the good road looks like.
    Thank you again. You’re a godsend.

  13. I just wondered if you had used any of Michael Yapko’s resources. Hypnosis may help you in your struggle with depression. My heart goes out to you. Blessings….

  14. Therese, you are my new favorite writer, and all thanks to a Psychology Today article who quoted your “What I wish people would know about depression.” My question is this, I have been wanting to become a blogger and write on such topics as depression and spirituality and psychology subjects that I have been involved with for a long time. But then I find blogs such as yours, and I wonder if I really have what it takes to be a writer. How did you get started? Does one have to be fully recovered in order to advise people about mental health? I’ve always wanted to be a writer and have kept journals since I was 15…but…I just don’t know. I’m also quite concerned about anonymity, as I’m afraid that revealing things about myself might affect my chances for employment. Any advice you can offer would be greatly appreciated.

    1. Hi Lilu,
      Thanks very much for the feedback. I think if you feel compelled to write, you should. No, you don’t have to be recovered. If you did, I wouldn’t write anything! If you are afraid of it hurting chances of employment, you could always just start a blog with a pseudonym. I hope that you are able to express yourself somehow. It does help recovery. Best, therese

    1. Eric, you’re not a moron! You just spelled Therese’s last name incorrectly. It’s just a wee typo. You’ve got an ‘n’ in her last name instead of an “r” So the last part of her website is spelled b.o.r.c.h.a.r (not an “n”).d.com (Don’t put the dots in, just wanted to illustrate correct spelling!)

      cheers! Cathy

  15. I came across your work on a link given in a support group for cardiomyopathy and found it very interesting thank you…

    Cardiomyopathy is a chronic illness that affects the heart f(in more ways than one) and can be inherited or acquired from a virus, so both old and young people can be diagnosed with a heart that is not working efficiently and of course this is very frightening. It would be easy to let negative thoughts take you down that spiral into depression and many folks with this disease struggle with that. I had to give up the job that I loved and my passion for contemporary dance and exercise (former teacher) and knew that if I did not remain positive i would end up talking to the walls, in those early lonely days of diagnosis when i found myself at home alone, missing my work, my colleagues and my interests.

    I took up writing (had dabbled in it a little before as a teacher of dance and drama ) I also replaced my vigorous exercise regime ( doctor’s orders) with tai chi and mindfulness and currently work as a volunteer with a local mindfulness project.

    All of these have been great therapy for me and my heart function has improved and generally I remain very optimistic. I have self published 6 poetry books one of which coincidentally is called ‘Out of the Blue’ and I wrote it especially for the cardiomyopathy association to raise money for them as they rely on charitable donations.I give talks about all of this and have raised over £6000 for heart charities from the sale of my little books and poetry book marks, including my local hospital who looked after me so well.

    My illness has opened new doors for me and although I cannot do what I did before and need days of rest I focus on what I can now do, not what I can’t. It is also some comfort to know that my writing helps others as I am sure yours does too. Here is one of my latest poems that went viral globally when I posted it for one of the cardiomyopathy members, after thy expressed their concerns about people, especially those closest to us, not understanding an invisible illness….. I thought you and others might appreciate it…..

    Keep up the valuable work that you do Therese it is so important to reach out to others…

    A NECESSARY TIME
    If I unexpectedly become quiet
    And seem distant to you
    Please do not be offended
    For me this is nothing new
    I have an invisible illness
    I may suddenly hit a brick wall
    All energy drained from me
    Which is not pleasant at all
    Some days I feel better than others
    But occasionally I have to think twice
    As when the busyness of life takes over
    Unfortunately I will pay the price
    My heart does not work efficiently
    It quite often needs a rest
    A necessary time to recover
    Enabling me once more to do my best
    It is difficult to function in a world
    That does not always understand
    So when I become tired and afraid
    All I ask is that you gently hold my hand.
    ©Suzanne Kelsey 2014
    Carlisle, Cumbria, UK

    1. Hi Suzanne, really, really loved your poem. It spoke eloquently to me. My ailments are somewhat different from yours, but I have the same symptoms…..having an invisible illness & hitting a brick wall. Just hold my hand.

  16. Hi, I have been treated for depression and anxiety attacks since I was 28 years old and I am now 59. Right now I take Lexapro but some days which can turn into weeks I still get depressed and negative thoughts that won’t go away etc. My father had depression so bad that only ECT worked for him at times when the meds didn’t. he suffered so much and I have inherited it . I am very afraid of becoming like my father as I get older as they say depression gets worse as you get older I ordered the omegabrite fish oil that you talked about and the probiotic and I plan to order your books too. I wanted to help my father and his brothers who also inherited depression from my grandfather who also had it but my dad had it the worst.I also want to help those who are so misunderstood because of this illness. I admire your work so much but most of all your heart for reaching out to us.

  17. Am feeling overwhelmed by your achievements, Therese. Kudos to you. It is great to be able to help other people. Hope your outreach uplifts you every day.

  18. Dear Therese, I have written to you before and love your blog. But today is an especially horrible day and I really don’t know if I can make it. I have been in bed for days, no shower (TMI), putting off any doctor or any other appointments I had for months now – and just now had a huge blow-up with my husband. I know you can’t do anything except tell me to go to the Emergency Room, probably, or something of that nature, but I feel very – I can’t even think of the word. I am already on several medications through my doctor/psychiatrist and have also been seeing a therapist. Obviously, these don’t seem to be working. I am a spiritual person, and have tried praying, etc., but am so agitated I can’t concentrate. I live in fear that I will be put in to some “place” to get better and even though I majored in psychology in college, this still feels like a great stigma to me. I have been tamping down my feelings for months (family issues, but more to do with my husband). You may suggest marital counseling, but I don’t believe he would go. He thinks it is all my problem. I know I do have problems, but I truly do not think it is all my fault.
    I am sorry this was so long, but I am truly at the end of my rope. I have thought of “ending it”, but don’t feel it is right spiritually, and, it sounds mercenary, but I would want my daughter to get any of my financial assets, tiny as they are.
    Thank you for the lifeline. It’s just that when I feel this bad for so long, I’m unable to even get out of bed, as I said, much less try to do the good things you do suggest for this trouble.
    This is Sunday – if I make it through today, i will contact my doctor tomorrow and see if he can do anything, but I think going to my therapist again would not help, (and I am going to look at the Therapist/Psychiatrist referral you just emailed out.)
    Thank you for just listening. If you have any “words of wisdom” I would be grateful, but I know you are extremely busy, so I do understand if you are not able to answer me.
    Bless you.

    1. Hi Helen,
      I’m so sorry you are struggling. I don’t have any direct advice to throw to you because I would need to know more. HOWEVER, I CAN tell you that you won’t always feel this way. That I DO know. And you must trust it, because it is the only thing that can get you through some of the worst times. That and taking it 15 minutes at a time. Not even an hour. It’s too long. But just tackle 15 minutes at a time. I also think it would help to ask others, either on Group Beyond Blue or Project Beyond Blue, what they have done when they feel that they are at the end of the rope. Or even just reading some of their stories will help you feel less alone. There are so many people feeling like you are right now. I know it’s hard to believe, but it’s really true. Try to get some support there, and know that the horrible part will pass. It really will. I’m keeping you in my thoughts and prayers. Therese

      1. Dearest Therese, I can’t believe you answered so quickly. Thank you so much. That in itself stirred something good and positive in me. ( I had gone straight back to bed with the pillow over my head after taking some medication and slept a little and just checked my email when I got up and couldn’t believe yours was there.) I will try to follow your suggestions. Really I will. You are one of my “inspirations” that I look up to, like – oh, Deepak Chopra for one current example- Jesus, Gandhi, and Buddha for past ones. I do know I am not the only one feeling this way, and then I end up chastising myself and feeling worse. Yes, I will keep checking Project Beyond Blue and the Group, too, as you said – when I am not in bed – augh. Thank you for saying the horrible part will pass. You, who have been so through so much……it is a help…..even though I feel bad right now. Bless you, Therese, for keeping me in your prayers. It means so much to me.
        I will probably wake up tomorrow and cringe at what I wrote for all the world (here) to see. It is embarrassing to me. I wasn’t sure if it would post here as well, or just be an email to you. That is another thing, I think, after looking at the book, “The Highly Sensitive Person” that I am one in spades. I will try to get over that, but I know it will bother me.
        Anyway, thank you so very much again and I hope things go well for you. I will keep you in my prayers as well, you are such a blessing. Terilee

  19. “We humans have a second brain. Come to think of it, men have three.” Your quote in Digestive Health. Why are you insulting men? Please apologize.

  20. Hello Therese

    I just found your site just felt I needed to vent. Ive tried 11 or 12 different meds to no avail, see a therapist twice a week, joined a support group and have a pretty descent sized support system of people that want me to beat this severe depression I struggle with. But every morning I wake up to basically mental torture. I pray to God as hard as I can begging and pleading for him to help me and I question if he even hears me. Im mentally and spiritually worn out. I feel like giving up to end the pain because I feel my life is passing me by as I deal with this and I cant resemble the person I use to be. I hate myself for having this condition, for feeling useless as I cant joke with my friends like I use to and they have to deal with what I struggle with. I don’t see an end to this. Im scared to fall asleep because I know when I wake up the pain will be there. I hate my life and wish I can end it, I hate that I have not been able to live up to the potential it could’ve had and I hate myself more for that. At times Ive come close to just giving up, putting a knife to my wrist to see if I could just do it. I honestly don’t know for how long I can keep going like this. I turn to my friends for help when its bad but I feel guilt for that, for burdening them with my problem. Im scared one day the pain will be too much and I wont be able to stop myself from doing something I shouldn’t.

    1. Dear Danny – I read what you wrote with tears streaming down my cheeks. I have no advice except to seek out a good therapist and psychiatrist. I am also suffering and when Therese writes about her own struggles, I realize she could be me. I suffer with getting out of bed, getting dressed, have already quit work, every little thing gets on my nerves, and even a small problem paying a bill on the phone can reduce me to tears. I went to finally see a psychiatrist last week. She said the medication I was on for 8 years was like drinking water. I am only on day 5 of Zoloft. It is difficult to wean off of one and get the other in my bloodstream and brain. Nausea and crying jags are a daily occurrence, complicated by irritability. Everyone has told me keep pounding through….Zoloft has been the best thing ever. Long long story for me….been suffering for years and yes suicide has breezed in and out of my mind. But couldn’t do that to my mom. I hate waking up most mornings. I understand. I wish you better days ahead. I understand. I truly understand.

  21. Hi Therese,
    This is Amit Kumar and I am from India. I am engineer by profession. I am also having very difficult time with blues since years. I found your blog yesterday and found it interesting. Some of the alternative supplements which you have mentioned I am not sure whether it is available in India. I one more thing l like to share which has helped me lot to fight with blue is Sudarshan Kriya from Art of Living. Thanks for giving hope to many people across globe. Thanks!!!

  22. Therese..recently got as close as one can get .. Acceptance and determination to carry out the ending step…began the process but was unable to finish .. Couldn’t get the instrument to cut deep enough.. Process interrupted by ex husband calling and insisting to come check on me..previous attempts made in past but never with acceptance and determination as this time

  23. Therese Borchard,

    My wife and I just had a cute baby girl. It has been 7 months, and my wife left me abruptly and wants a divorce. I read up on bipolar depression, and was wondering how I might be able to talk to her and get her to come home with our two kids, so I can get her some psychological help? I love her tremendously and if it is a mental illness, it is not her fault or mine for not understanding each other. Any advice to help my little family and my sweet marriage.

    Thank you

  24. Hi
    i am suffering from depression .i am feeling helpless.everyday i wake up i hope all will be fine but at last i am wrong.i want your help.

  25. Hi Therese:

    I just started writing for PsychCentral.com last month.

    I loved your blog post on Mother Theresa.

    Thank you for sharing your life. I too have bipolar illness. I first blogged about it for empowher.com in 2009.

    Glad to be back to the subject at PsychCentral.com. Hope I can shine a bit of light on it.

    Best,

    Laura Yeager

  26. Hi Therese

    I had heard your story at a out patent treatment, that I am going through right know. As I heard your story I seen a image of myself, and what I am going through even today. I am happy that are people are out there that suffer from the same issues that I have, and I am able to reach out to others when I need help. Thank you very much for what you, and for becoming a big help in my life, and the lives of others around me.

  27. Dear Therese,

    I am an Extended Project Qualification student from Newcastle-under-Lyme School and I’m currently researching the awareness levels of food alternatives to anti-depressants. It is a topic that really interests and intrigues me. I understand that you are very experienced in the world of nutrition and holistic health and I have read some of your articles which talk about ways to combat depression naturally. I found it quite fascinating. Therefore I have decided to contact you to ask you for your personal opinion on the general awareness levels of the food alternatives to anti-depressants in the UK. I’d also like to ask for your permission to quote sections of your response in the final written project and also in the presentation that I will be delivering to teachers and friends from my School. I would be extremely grateful if you were to reply (even just briefly) to this comment.

    Many thanks,
    Alice Lovett

  28. Therese,

    I left the following comments on PsychCentral this afternoon in response to your article, “Is Depression Always a Disease?” I am not sure why my comments were not posted. Were they deemed inappropriate or not politically correct or did someone who monitors your blog (either you or someone else not agree with what I had to say? I’d appreciate a response from either you, John Grohol or a representative at PsychCentral regarding your censorship policy. I stand in my truth based upon my own life experience with depression. I think it is only honorable to consider my perspective and act respectfully even if you are not in full agreement with my views. Thank you for your consideration.

    The comments I originally attempted to post to Psych Central follow:

    Humans are not ‘diseased’, ‘disordered’, or ‘mentally ill’. Humans are human. Human beings experience pain and suffering as part of the human condition. As soon as we start recognizing the effects of childhood trauma and failed attachments as the source of much pain and suffering in this world, the better. I applaud you Therese for your curiosity and honesty about the possible source of your own suffering. My own story: I was chronically depressed for three decades. Sometimes the depression was so bad, I’d lay in bed for months. I also went to some very dark places. In my thirties, I was told my doctor that I needed psychiatric medication because my depression was genetic. It wasn’t true. I was later told I was bipolar. This also was not true. The source of my depression as well as anxiety was childhood trauma that I chose to put away. To make a long story short: I got into trauma therapy. I processed the pain. Today I am no longer depressed. I no longer need to take psychiatric medications.

    I believe that psychiatrists and doctors need to begin to act more ethical, honestly and with a greater degree of integrity. For a trauma survivor, like myself, being lied to felt like another betrayal, not unlike the betrayal I experienced in childhood. Many people identify with the ‘stop mental illness’ stigma movement (especially on Twitter) because I think it gives them a sense of validation and identity. But ‘mental illness’ or a disorder such as ‘bipolar’ is not an identity. Although Big Pharma and those promoting psychiatric medications might have you believe it is your identity. Your identity develops as you learn to tolerate the full range of the human experience. Your identity grows and shifts when you no longer need to put a lid on your feelings. These feelings are often unconscious and buried. CBT does not help because it does not facilitate access to the uncomfortable feelings and content that a traumatized child often has to put away to survive. This is not easy work. And yet, I believe, in order to fully integrate, in order to live an authentic existence requires that we learn to be honest with ourselves, our limitations and learn presence through meditation, yoga, being with nature and other daily practices.

    Regarding EFT: I understand that many people like EFT. They see benefit from doing this technique, however,it does not take the place of trauma work. It’s a technique among many that an individual may choose to promote healing and integration. Most people need to use a variety of things to get the best results. There’s also biofeedback, EMDR, somatic work. Treatment modality often depends on the nature of the childhood trauma and abuse. I’ve worked in a peer support capacity with trauma survivors. While I think it’s important to empower ourselves to become our own healers and to seek out what methods work best for our own healing, this does not take the place of trauma therapy work! There are lots of life coaches out there as well as charlatans eager to take money from the vulnerable. Please consider working with a professional, licensed trauma therapist if you think you have unresolved trauma issues.

    I wish everyone the best. This can be a long road. And once you get past the bumps, life can be pretty wonderful. <3

  29. Hi! i went to my local barnes and noble to try and pick up your book, and they didnt have it. :( I thought i’d look on your site to see if there was a e-book edition and happen to see that you were in my same town! i can try and order it on amazon but do you know where their might be a copy for sale in Annapolis?

    Thanks!
    ashley

  30. Therese, I read that you wrote a piece titled “How Does Your Depression Affect Your Child” in 2010. I share the flip side of bipolar disorder–how my mother’s mania affected me in my book “Mom, Mania, and Me, Surviving and Changing a Volatile Relationship.” It will be available Aug. 8, 2016. I, too, had a hard time recalling my childhood. Over the years I developed some unique techniques for coping with Mom. But it took me 20 years to figure out how to get her to accept her illness and stay on her meds. I will be happy to send you an advanced review copy (postal) or a comprehensive synopsis (email). Just ask. Diane

  31. I have never connected with anyone on this subject like you. I would like to know how you would like for people who serve others by sharing their experiences and learned coping skills, like. I am concerned about infringing on your copy rights. Could you give me a guideline on how to share your information without doing this.
    Basically, I am interested in sharing some articles in group settings. And do some one on one affiliate marketing by leading people to your sites. The books I can Buy.The thoughts I can teach. Just need to know how.

  32. I have a dual DX but after over 50 years of “talk therapy”, cocktails of medicines, and finally
    separated from all of this i came to a conclusion that if I am not for me, who will be? I am reconnecting to
    a small discussion group, attempting to bring back friendships which i’lost over time and going on museum shows and looking at art and photo shows,etc. with my older brother which leads to discussions both present and future,not the past. the skills which people have for relaxing with others,listening and envying their lives a bit told me that I never 1)was allowed to handle situations and converse with others. These simple activities come slowly but i have hope esperanza.

    If I may give you an article I read in the New Yorker in September or Decembe r2015 New Yorker about “Lighting the Brain’
    by Karl Deisseroth who did a wonder with his neuroscience /psychiatrist skills and genius. his is going to a new frontier for depression,I HOPE
    HE IS ONLY IN HIS EARLY FORTIES!
    thank you for your site,
    Melisse Schecter

  33. Hi Therese,

    I spent all day today learning more about you and the inspiring work that you do. I don’t think words can express my gratitude for your work and for coming across your blog.

    After losing a friend to depression I made it my mission to do something about mental health. I built an anonymous app that connects you to similar thoughts, as you express yourself. Letting you know you are not alone.

    I would be humble for the opportunity of connecting with you further and getting your thoughts and advice on our movement.

    Many many thanks. I really look forward to hearing back from you
    Pouria

  34. Dear Therese,

    Hello! My name is Lauren Sayers, and I am a volunteer board member at the Anxiety Resource Center, a small non-profit located in the heart of Grand Rapids, Michigan. I recently came across your article 5 Ways to Manage Autumn Anxiety while researching mental health and anxiety related topics for the ARC. I found your article informative and relatable and know it would greatly benefit our audience.

    Briefly, as a non-profit, we exist to provide both a physical place, as well as a web-presence reaching out to those struggling with anxiety disorders and to help reduce the stigma associated with these illnesses. At our Center, we offer a variety of free resources and services including a lending library, support groups, social outings, and professional presentations.

    To help us reach a broader audience, as well as those homebound by the illness, the ARC started a blog called Through the Lens. It’s an opportunity for our readers to look through the lens of someone else. Our hope is to feature a variety of authors from those struggling with the illness to professionals who can offer advice, insight, and inspiration. Would you consider allowing us to syndicate your article about autumn anxiety on our blog? (Please note, I will include a link to the original article.)

    Thank you, Therese, for considering this request and for adding light to the many lives struggling in darkness. I look forward to hearing back from you.

    Sincerely,
    Lauren Sayers

  35. Theresa–I love the “deal” that you made with God and that you are in the world making it better for those of us who share your struggle. Do you have any advice for someone like myself that gets extremely depressed because of feeling like a complete failure due to inability to focus with Inattentive ADHD. My mind feels like a leaf in the wind and I can’t get anything done. Even things that I feel are so important like sharing my music. Just can’t myself to do it! Thank you again for your contribution! Lori

  36. Hi Therese,
    This note references your article “How Does Your Depression Affect Your Child?”(Feb.24,2016).

    I am 71 1/2 , a RN, and have 4 grown children – 47, 47, 47 and 34. For 6 weeks every year my son and surprise twin daughters are the same age!
    My daughter L. is 34, is an OB/GYN about 50 miles from where I live. For the last 25+ years I’ve been treated for depression by many assorted inadequate psychiatrists and therapists with 25 or more meds which never helped. I have been off all psych meds since Spring, 2016 and feel better physically and sort of mentally than I have in years. Right now, and I may be mincing words, but I’m not depressed, just completely brokenhearted. I’ve been divorced 11 years from an MD who has covert, malignant,and vindictive narcissistic, sociopathic, schizoid, sexually addicted and sexually abusive personality disorders – of course, never formally diagnosed or treated. I now believe that the first shrink I ever saw in 1990 was correct and that my basic problems are Adult Children of Alcoholics and Dysfunctional Families based and unresolved grief over so many childhood losses and even more losses in my last 26 year marriage, and NOT depression. And now some PTSD after all the things and the gaslighting he did to me. My youngest daughter was conceived after a tubal reconstruction and a miscarriage and is a most remarkable person whom I would have loved and enjoyed had she been dumb as dirt and not beautiful and good and brilliant. I believe I was a wonderful mother to all my children – intentionally because I knew what a crazy, violent family and childhood I had and resolved always to let my children know how loved they were and how much they mattered and to help them get where they wanted to be in their lives -, and I was a wonderful wife. 13 years into our marriage he announced that he had been having a 3-year affair with his nurse. I turned to him and said “You would never do that!” And he said, but I have. 5 months later, playing me, loving me, but still messing with the nurse, he told me he was leaving me and taking our daughter with him, and I made a suicide attempt b/c in the small Alabama town where we lived I thought I would lose the love of my life whom I was sure God had brought to me and lose my daughter and not be able to prevent it. After a couple of months we reconciled and really, I thought, had another good 10 years of marriage and family. All that time he was having big and little affairs that I really did not know about. The wheels started to come off in 2003, and in January, 2004 I had a complete dissociative break, unaware and totally unplanned, shooting a hole in my kitchen floor with his snake pistol, and waking up from the noise of the gunshot. My daughters hospitalized me, not my spouse who abandoned me and served me with divorce papers in the hospital. I did everything all these different doctors told me to, was devastated by losing my husband, and L., in college and medical school, distanced herself a bit from the always healthy close relationship we had enjoyed, but we still saw each other fairly regularly. I was involved with her moving off and on, visited and lunched and dinnered, took part in her activities and planning her wedding and enjoying and staying with her new baby, helped with new houses, etc. But suddenly 31 months ago she wrote me and said she couldn’t be a wife, mother, homemaker and doctor and maintain a relationship with me. That she loved me and was seeing someone and taking some meds and that my depression had bothered her and she told me to quit reading between the lines and she didn’t plan on this being forever. She’s even blocked me from Facebook, and all her emails now go to her husband. I’m so embarrassed and ashamed. I’ve tried to observe her boundaries, but occasionally have written letters accepting blame for everything I can think of and sent gifts for her baby’s birthday and Christmas and recently just a grandmother gift. Recently I accidentally found out that she is pregnant again using IVF. And her husband wrote me and said not to write or send any more gifts. I’ve already needlepointed Christmas ornaments for her daughter and new grandbaby – that’s what I always do – Christmas ornaments of some kind – for my 12 grandchildren at Christmas – , and I’m going to send them after Thanksgiving, even if they send them back. She and I are both missing out on so much.

    I am devastated. I have recently developed Type2 Diabetes and high BP, am older b/c I had her at 37, but am basically in pretty good health, but am so afraid I’m going to die and never see her again She has become aligned with her father, much closer than growing up, monster that he turned out to be -narcissism personified. I found out so much AFTER we divorced, even that he’d molested a teen-age girl spending the night in our house with an older daughter.I’m a trauma and ICU and ER nurse and a good person and would never have tolerated that had I known about it. We hardly ever argued, and never in front of L., but I’m sure there were atmospheric changes in our household, but I tried to make life good for all of us. I am overwhelmed at this loss because we really were close in such good, healthy ways. A committed Christian, I’m having trouble trusting God – like I always have had trouble, thinking that God would come through for everybody else, but not for me in this life where I could enjoy it. I can’t even be grateful for the ultimate gift of heaven.

    I saved your article, as so many things you’ve written have spoken to me, because of my dilemma. I’ve been through so much, but I am such a good, nice person and have tried so hard all my life to make a difference for my husbands and children and for others. I’m not sleeping, waking up crying, isolated, so lonely, reading books and listening to CD books constantly,going to Body Pump, and church small groups and Bible studies, gave up watching Property Brothers and Fixer Upper because it’s so painful to watch all the happy families.I think I’m writing to ask if you think there’s any hope that she’ll come back to me. I feel so responsible because of the depression that really WASN’T and the help I didn’t get. That first shrink explained the ACOA stuff to my husband, and he was angry and felt blamed, which he wasn’t. So that Dx went nowhere. Off and on I’m a little bit angry.

    Thanks for all the good things you accomplish with your writing. I admire you and your family.

    Robin
    (Is it possible to use just my first name. We know lots of medical people who probably read your work.)

    I

  37. Hi

    I’ve been following your blog for quite some time now, and I would really like to contribute if possible.

    I’m reaching out to see if you’d be interested in featuring a guest post from FindaTopDoc.com. We also have a blog on our site at [thereseborchard.com], where we share resources and tips.

    I believe I can add value to your audience on a few different topics, and so I’ve included those topics I think would really resonate with your readers here:

    1. Causes that could lead to depression

    2. Clinical impact of depression

    3. Genetic factors associated with depression

    4. Symptoms of depression

    5. Is there a treatment available for depression?

    Best wishes,

    Matt

    FindaTopDoc.com Blogger

  38. Hello,
    My name is Megan Thompson and I am currently in my final year at University. I am conducting research into the correlation of mental health and wellbeing with fitness and physical activity for my dissertation topic.
    I was wondering if you would be able to help me out by answering a few questions for me relating to this. If you are able to help I will send the questions over via email for you to answer at your convenience.

    Thank you for taking the time to read this and I hope to hear from you soon,
    Megan Thompson.

  39. Hi Theresa,

    Very genuine and caring blog.

    I help many clients deal with depression. I’ve accumulated a lot of knowledge and understanding of depression. I would like to contribute to your next articles so you can reach an even bigger audience.

    I will also advertise and promote you on all of my social media.

    Would you like to discuss what information I can provide to you for your next article? inspireyourselflc@gmail.com

  40. Therese, I found your website about three months ago. After reading a few posts I purchased Beyond Blue. Compared to many people, my depression and anxiety isn’t bad – I’d call it moderate. The struggles of many break my heart.

    I dealt with depression and anxiety on my own, but when I began to get thoughts like “it would be just fine if I were dead” I knew I needed help. My depression and anxiety was made worse by the Shingles which I experienced two years ago – I still suffer from postherpetic neuralgia. I also struggle with tinnitus that can be quite loud.

    Beyond Blue is a major blessing for me!!! You give me hope, a plan of action, put things into perspective while even making me laugh which is especially needed at times. And, I didn’t think I’d find someone to help me whose faith in God is an important source of strength with this struggle.

    God bless you, Therese, and thank you very, very much!!!

    Matt Brockman

  41. Hi,

    I work with a company called FindaTopDoc, an online doctor listing and Medical Information in the USA.

    I’m writing to you because I’d love to contribute a guest post. Are you still accepting them? Thanks for your time, and I hope to hear from you soon, Matt

    Best wishes,

    Matt

    FindaTopDoc.com Blogger

  42. Tried to find an email address for you, instead will mention it here.
    In the sidebar of this site, you have a textwidget that is “About” you with your profile pic, etc.
    The URL for Project Hope is incorrect. Ironically it took me to a “No such server” sort of page, leaving me ProjectHope-less.

    “http://community.hopeandbeyond.com” should be “http://community.projecthopeandbeyond.com”

    JBB

  43. Hi Therese,

    I’m reaching out to request permission to share an article you previously wrote on Psych Central – Face It: 6 Steps to Help Women Deal with Aging. Link to article here: https://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2010/05/16/face-it-6-steps-to-help-women-deal-with-aging/

    As background, I am working with an eco-luxe skin care and beauty brand, Kari Gran, that recently launched a bold campaign titled “Wear Yourself In.” It serves as a counterpoint to the ridiculous notion women need to be “fixed up” to look their beautiful best, and instead encourages the over 40 crowd to reflect on and respect the life they’ve lived, the wisdom they’ve gained, and the skin that’s weathered it all. In short, we want every woman to be her own cozy, comfortable, well-loved favorite pair of jeans.

    We created a site that hosts campaign collateral, essays written by our partners, and other content that aligns well with our campaign – it can be found here: wearyourselfin.com. We would be honored if you would grant us permission to share your piece on our site as it fits so well with the storytelling we are doing within the campaign. You would of course be given full credit and we would link directly to your article within the post, too.

    I’m happy to provide additional details on the campaign, if you’re interested, and I look forward to hearing from you!

    Thank you,

    Lourdes

    1. Thank you for the article on depression/obsession. Mine came simultaneously. An incident I thought long repressed and severe depression. I thought for a time I was nuttier than I thought.

  44. Hello Therese,

    We are excited to be embarking on yet another amazing online event on behalf of LiveFitNow.tv: “Healthy Never Tasted Better” – 30 Days & 30 Ways To Eat Fit!

    I am honored to invite you to become part of our presenting experts’ panel. You will be joining over 25 other leaders in wellness and nutrition who will be sharing their cutting edge advice on fit living through fit eating.

    *** This is an online event. You will be interviewed over skype. All expert interviews will be pre-recorded videos, about 20-40 min long. Summit start date will be May 3rd.

    The Healthy Never Tasted Better Summit’s mission is to show people how easy and fun it is to commit to healthy delicious meals which is the cornerstone for living fit.

    Discussion topics include:

    How to introduce clean and whole foods to your diet
    How to prepare healthy and delicious meals without the fuss and hastle of extended cooking time
    Nutritional choices for increased energy, weight loss and overall improved lifestyle
    Benefits of mindful eating and food preparation
    And more….

    Is healthy living aligned with your message?

    Our Host, Jill Smart, is an inspirational health leader. After being housebound for two years due to a severe knee injury and multiple surgeries, she transformed her life with whole food nutrition, juicing, fitness and mindset. This resulted in her complete recovery and an 80 pound weight loss in less than one year. Jill is a former coaching director of FitLife.tv and a recent founder of In Heart Flow.

    LiveFitNow.tv has invited Jill to host this series of interviews on wholefood nutrition, prep meals and overcoming fitness obstacles.

    *Important requirements:

    A short 20-40min online video interview between now and April 20th
    You must have a mailing list following of 10k+ (Direct Email)
    Joint promote the summit with 2 solo emails and 2 newsletters between 15th April – April 30th.

    Can’t wait to hear from you!

    Spaces for experts are limited! Please read the requirements above and respond at your earliest convenience if you’d like to become part of the Healthy Never Tasted Better Summit!

    Yours in Health & Wellness,

    Nevena D.
    Events Manager
    Affinity365

  45. Dear Therese,

    I work in conjunction with Westside Treatment, a West Los Angeles IOP, PHP and OP treatment center focused on a therapeutic environment for healing, reflection and long-lasting change. We have a staff of writers who constantly produce very high quality content for our website and blog. You can review a sample of our content here:

    https://westsidetreatment.com/blog/

    It is my job to reach-out to other websites in similar markets in an effort to develop collaborative relationships. We would love the opportunity to guest post on your blog. If you are open to it, we would like to send you a very well written and edited article which you could post onto your website. We will never re-use or re-purpose this content. It will be 100% original and unique content produced exclusively for you and your website. We would include a link back to https://westsidetreatment.com/ within the article.

    Please let me know if this is something you might be interested in.

  46. Hi Theresa,

    I am Ian Schell, I have suffered depression and anxiety most of my adult life. On my 21st birthday in 2000, attempted to end my life, but fortunately, I messed that up. In 2014 I contemplated it once more. This time with a wife and kids, it wasn’t an option.

    I got good holistic help, new info and tools. Now, I am glad to say, happier and healthier than ever.

    I am now on a mission to share that holistic information, to help people improve the quality of their lives.
    To do that, I wrote my first book ‘DeFunkMe: The Basix’ which explores the six essentials to beat stress, depression and anxiety. I need to get this book into the hands of as many people as possible. It is not about the money or fame, just getting the info out.

    I need help to do this.

    I have a 55 strong launch team of friends and family, who have generously volunteered their time and efforts to help pump the launch on Amazon May 8. Through our efforts to date, we have 156 people signed up for the free promotional download on May 8&9. Come launch day, we will work together to hopefully get 1000 free downloads.

    I am searching for influencers who may be willing to help the cause, to get this info out, and lift people up.

    I realise you probably have these sorts of requests all the time, and I appreciate your time thus far!
    Unfortunately, I don’t have a lot to offer in return, other than some solid info for your audiences.

    Please let me know if you’d be willing to help in any way. If not that is ok too!

    Much love and keep up the great work,

    Ian Schell
    ian@defunkme.com
    http://www.defunkme.com

  47. For anyone who has ever suffered from depression or anxiety, has felt not worthy, then this film is for you. Depression is a problem, but how many people have actually had an insight into what it actually feels like?
    Mental health issues are still stigmatised and often ignored ,especially when it’s men who are suffering.
    ‘S.A.D.’ is an important film that aims to put the viewer directly in the shoes of someone struggling from depression and his downward spiral when help isn’t sought.

  48. l read your beautifully written article, faith and depression, and you said god, l am a 82 years old muslim man from Turkey and a proud American from 1960, l belive a god every body’s god, faith for me is a religion , l am a muslim but do not believe lots of thinks about her, l do not pray to Muhammed , he is the leader and founder of islam, just like Jesus , bot they all born and died, but god belong to all of us and l do pray to him any time and any where, but my depression is from my old age and do not enjoy my life any more, l have kids and grand kids but l choose to live all by myself, l am too strong minded and l hope l do what is right and wrong so l am trying been a good person , do not lie and be a good father and this is my faith, as you know that is what faith try to teach us, but l use med. for, and do not read any think depress me ,l love your articles god bless you and please keep up the good work

  49. Dear, I have read your articles and saw your videos.I felt the pain in your voice. I tried to email you personally with no success. I developed a tool that helps people become more positive using their own VOICE. I think it can be useful to many people suffer from depression. Please try ThinkUp app (iOS & Android) and I would love to guide you step by step how to change the voice in your head… Irit

  50. Hi Therese, I came across your post searching for something. Searching for an answer I know I won’t find. No offense but the minute I pulled up your post, I could see the same look in your eyes, and the smile we all hide behind. Strangely it gave me a sense of trust, and so I decided to continue reading your post. I was even more comforted to find the quote by David Foster Wallace, a quote I must have a shared a thousand times with others; part as an indirect explanation of my own feelings and cry for help; part as comfort to the grieving, and part as way to enlighten the ignorant and judgemental. It’s amazing to see the time line difference of your post and all the papers, emails,and texts I’ve sent with pretty much similar details. Then, in the about section, it stated your spouse’s name, guess what the same. I chuckled. No coincidence (I pay attention to weird things ). Thanks for posting. I’ve pretty much come to the point where talking myself back to life, bargaining for life, is not working. I’ve reached out, which felt like a burden has been lifted to a point, but the pain….the pain, and noise is still standing strong. Please email me. Thanks. I don’t know that I expect anything should you respond, but it’s comforting to know you get it. Besides the David Foster Wallace quote, your post was the next best thing, to truly explain it all in few words. Especially the part about being envious of the dead. Thanks so much. I think we all know when our time is getting closer, to sneeze. Email if you get this please. Good work! Thanks.

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