Month

April 2018
Of all my tools to combat depression and negativity, humor is by far the most fun. And just like mastering the craft of writing, I’m finding that the longer I practice laughing at life–and especially it’s frustrations–the better I become at it, and the more situations and conversations and complications I can place into that...
Each year I try to attend the Johns Hopkins Annual Mood Disorders Research and Education Symposium because there I learn from the top experts in the field and gain evidence-based information that I can pass along to you. Hopkins holds a special place in my heart because it was my consultation at the Mood Disorders...
For a good year or so of my life, I wanted to be another blogger, a woman who is exceptionally good at writing about happiness. I envied her tremendous online following and book success, but I was also jealous of her subject matter. I toyed with the idea of recasting myself as a happiness expert instead...
In her book Robert Lowell: Setting the River on Fire, bestselling author and Johns Hopkins Professor of Psychiatry Kay Redfield Jamison writes: I believe that mania and genius not uncommonly exist together, that suffering can be brought to some good, that the fast swither of mania can fire ambition, steel the nerve, and give wind...
It’s tempting for anyone who writes about depression and anxiety to preach from hindsight, after he has “recovered” from his mood disorder: “This is what I did to free myself from addiction” … “Here are five steps to instant weight loss” … “These are eight techniques to cure anxiety.” If you look at the list...